I’ve Got Cancer, And Every Reason To Be Glad.

I’ve been wanging on about the Breast surgery for a while –  it’s time to talk about the cancer bit of my Breast Cancer.

This week, my surgeon confirmed that a bit of cancer was found in one of the sentinel lymph nodes that was removed at the time of my mastectomy surgery. I was told that I’ll definitely have radiotherapy, and chemotherapy is highly likely. I left that meeting on cloud nine. Despite the fact that my cancer has spread from its original home in the duct, to my breast tissue (making it ‘invasive’), and thence to a lymph node,  I am still at the ‘curable’ end of the scale. It’s all relative you see. I’m not just looking on the bright side here – there’s no forced positivity when you come out of an appointment and know your life isn’t hanging by a thread.

I had “the cancer fear” much like anyone else. But once you’ve GOT the cancer, the fear scale shifts. All cancer is bad. But there’s bad cancer, and there’s really fucking bad cancer and all the bits in between really matter.

It’s grotesquely over simplified, probably highly offensive, and almost certainly inaccurate, but this is how I understood how to position my own cancer before going into the meeting.



At each point of not-knowing, early on in the process of diagnosis, when I  knew I had “something’ but I didn’t know what the something was yet in wait of the tumour biopsy results, and then again waiting for lymph node biopsies,  I had moments where I mentally placed myself up and down this scale, dialling the fear-factor up and down accordingly. On the left, (American accent) “I can do this. I am going to nail this fucking fucker”. To the right, “Oh fuck. I’m fucked.  Completely and utterly fucked” (definitely a British accent. Probably northern). Squaring up to face death. Most of this happened in my mind , and only fleetingly. I was trying not to think, you see, dealing only with the information in front of me, but the thinking was happening without me even thinking I was thinking it. Damn brain.

Following my last meeting with the surgeon, as of Wednesday the 3rd of April 2019, in spite of this early spread, I am still firmly down at the left hand side of that shitty cancer spectrum.  I have a fairly common cancer, a treatable one, and It’s only been found in one lymph node and that’s now out. The working assumption is that surgery has nailed it, and radio and maybe chemo, plus further hormone treatment,  will do their magic to blitz anything else sinister lurking about and prevent a recurrence (with the understanding that treatment does not come with guarantees). It may not seem like it, but this IS cause for celebration. So many people aren’t this lucky at this moment. Some people, with very few symptoms, get terminal off the bat.

And there’s more.  The gladness comes from something much bigger than “shit but treatable”. My friend Emma pointed me in the direction of an article by George Monbiot, columnist for the guardian, who last year wrote about his prostate cancer.

In his own reflections on being grateful for his diagnosis, Monbiot goes wider in his assessment and creates his own scale – The Shitstorm scale. The Shitstorm Scale doesn’t just consider what might have been had the cancer not been caught early, but also any number of other tragedies and life disasters. It also considers within it other life circumstances to assess his position on the scale, and by his own calculation he’s a 2/10 as opposed to a 7/10, the latter being where he’d be placed on the Prostate cancer scale. Now that’s positivity for you.

My wider circumstances aren’t dissimilar to his; I have the NHS. I have a roof over my head. The love of a bloody good husband. My daughters. Family, here and abroad. A network of people – an extended ‘family’ of friends, neighbours, even acquaintances who hold us aloft, champion us, send us good vibe texts, hug emojis and playlists, and leave Shepherd’s Pie on the doorstep. And a rocking therapist. Helps.

Like George, when I look at my cancer for what it is, and in the context of a Big Life around it, I am one of the lucky ones.

Monbiot also writes about not letting fear rule your life


“There are, I believe, three steps to overcoming fear: name it, normalise it, socialise it. For too long, cancer has been locked in the drawer labelled Things We Don’t Talk About. When we call it the Big C, it becomes, as the term suggests, not smaller, but larger in our minds. He Who Must Not Be Named is diminished by being identified, and diminished further when he becomes a topic of daily conversation.”

George Monbiot

Making ‘cancer chat’ a daily reality through social media and this blog has helped me enormously.  It’s important we all talk about it. Not in hushed tones. Not with pity. Not with fear-faces. But just for what it is. Something that needs to be faced, my new reality, for the time being at least, and yours in part as someone who might know me. Bring it into the light and trust me when I say there is a hell of a lot to be glad about right now, and a bloody good life to be lived as I move through treatment. So let’s just crack on shall we?

{With thanks to George too, for unwittingly helping me to crack the title of this post. I totally remixed you Monbiot}